Labor Force Demographics

State LMI offices commonly get questions about characteristics of workers and non-workers.  While regular monthly data sources don’t have much detail in that area, there are a few options (with limited geographic extent or infrequent publication).

Data Sources

Geographic Extent Notes
BLS Geographic Profiles States and Census Regions This is an annual calculation from the CPS with a historical series going back to 1997. The release of the annual tables lags the end of the year by six months to a year.
ACS All Census geographies ACS has the most geographic detail, but is available annually or for a 5-year survey period.
WID Version? County and State ACS 2017 5-year data has been structured for use with the WID. This is still non-standard content but is available for download.

Table Format

This is non-standard content but has been structured to work seamlessly with the WID.

Table Structure

SQL Statements to create tables

Update Calendar

This is a new data source at the national level. If there’s interest, it will continue to be produced in future years, with updates occurring in January.

Related Tables

The structure of related tables and the SQL are in the same files under Table Format above.
Lookup table contents:
AGEGROUP and EDUCATION
UNIVERSE

   

Cost of Living

There are a number of sources of cost of living data with different methods and products.  They’re useful for research applications and to provide a reference point for wage data.  Although cost of living is non-standard and does not have a formal WID table, the content is useful enough to states to index here.

Data Sources

Geographic Extent Notes
MIT County This is an annual calculation that produces annual costs for various components (food, childcare, etc) and a required wage value to cover those costs for 14 family structures. You can find the documentation here.
C2ER County and MSA This is a widely-used annual index value but is available for a cost. You can find the documentation here.
WID Version? County and State This is an adaptation of a method developed by Minnesota. It has both component costs and an index value but is relatively new. You can find the documentation here and a visualization here.

Table Format

This is non-standard content but has been structured to work seamlessly with the WID.

Table Structure

SQL Statements to create tables

Update Calendar

This is a new data source at the national level. If there’s interest, it will continue to be produced in future years, with updates occurring in January or early February.

Related Tables

The structure of related tables and the SQL are in the same files under Table Format above.
Lookup table contents:
AgeCol
FamilyChars

   

CIP-SOC Crosswalks


Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) are crosswalked with SOC occupation codes to analyze educational outcomes, wage premiums, and workforce supply and demand.  Job banks use them to match qualifications with job postings and labor market data.

Data Sources

System
Versions
WID Content
Notes
IPEDSCurrent and prior versions2018
2010
2000
1990

ONETCurrentN/A

This version uses ONET codes instead of SOC codes.

Perkins IVCurrentN/A

Table Format

This crosswalk would be inserted into OCCXOCC and related look-up tables.

WID2.8

WID2.7

Update Calendar

Variable.

Related Tables

Links to the table description in the current structure document. Note: Page anchors do not work in Microsoft Edge (the default browser for some states).

OCCXOCC

OCCCODES

OCCTYPES

   

Military Crosswalks

Military crosswalks are used to match job classifications from the various branches of military to civilian jobs.  Veterans hiring and job programs attempt to identify the best fit for exiting service members, and to help employers understand the skills veterans bring with them.  The crosswalks can be complicated because the different branches of military have different coding structures, the most common classifications of military jobs have subclassifications, and there are frequent updates.

Data Sources

System
Versions
WID Content
Notes
US Department of Defense All available versions here  N/A

This is a complete list of military occupations mapped to SOC and ONET codes.  It’s compiled 3-4 times a year and distributed as an Access database.

O*NET Current  N/A O*NET gets military classification data from the DOD but adds some value and maps it to additional occupational structures.

Table Format

Crosswalks and military occupations can be mapped to OCCXOCC and MOCCODE, respectively.  Because this is non-standard content with narrow use, files are not provided in WID format.

WID2.7

Update Calendar

Variable.

Related Tables

Links to the table description in the current structure document.  Note: Page anchors do not work in Microsoft Edge (the default browser for some states).

OCCXOCC

MPC

MOCCODE

   

All Non-Standard

The WID is a database structure to facilitate communication and data sharing between states. It takes common data products and puts them in a format that 1) saves states the work of coming up with their own and creating the documentation to support and maintain it and 2) allows them to use common terms or formats in communications with other states. For these reasons, maintaining data in the prescribed WID format is funded by an ETA grant. However, there can sometimes be confusion about what parts of the WID are required deliverables.

The WID structure document is 146 pages long and includes structure and value information for more than 200 tables, not all of which have available data in every state or jurisdiction.

Required “core” tables – these are largely those tables for which state LMI offices already have BLS data and are summarized in Appendix C. Only core tables are mandated by the ETA grant.

Non-core tables are included for several possible reasons:

  • They’re likely to be needed by states, or are used by a significant percentage of states. This includes lookup tables of occupation and industry codes, crosswalks between different coding systems.
  • The data is readily available and provided in WID format by the ARC – population, demographics, and income, for example. These are subjects that are of interest to many state LMI offices and having them in a consistent format has the potential to reduce state workload.
  • They’re emerging as an area of interest or are core products of a few states. This might include the programs table (which houses IPEDS data, emerging as an area of interest because of WIOA requirements) or the JVS table, which houses job vacancy data some states collect.

Non-standard tables: ARC documentation and files exists for tables that aren’t in the formal WID structure document but are structured such that they could work seamlessly with it, using the same geographic and time references and relating back to the same lookup tables. These include geogxzip and some tax and GDP files. Some WID non-core tables started as non-standard tables, were found to be useful, and made it into the structure document later on.